Sep
6
2014

How to solve the skills shortage - employ people with disabilities!

Most of the developed world is now entering economic recovery. But Australia is not doing quite as well as some other countries, and there is a looming issue with something all too common during economic growth: a skills shortage.  Skills shortages also occur during economic decline but it can be more pronounced during periods of growth.

Each one of Australia’s states and territories is presently reporting skills shortages in multiple areas and the problem can come in many forms:

  1. Not enough qualified people to fill vacant roles

  2. Lack of experience of qualified people applying for those roles

  3. Disparity between employment package and employee expectations

  4. Jobs that regularly attract no applicants

  5. Unwillingness to relocate.

Tackling the Problem

One way to address the skills shortage is for businesses to offer better conditions and higher wages, but this is not always going to have the desired effect, especially if you are looking for people with niche skills who may not be looking for work. The newly-qualified aren't always going to have the experience you desire.  There is another answer and it means changing your business practice and outlook to focus in on expanding the talent pool.

Considering the disability employment participation rate in Australia and the high unemployment rate (which means they are willing and able to work), it is apparent that there is large untapped resource available to address some of the problems that Australian businesses face.

The Advantages of Employing People With Disabilities

I have discussed on this blog numerous times the impressive statistics regarding employees with disabilities:

  1. They take less sick time and are just as productive as any other worker

  2. They stay in jobs longer (are less likely to move on which is critical in jobs that require a lot of training)

  3. Are willing and motivated, largely because of the low participation rate of their demographic.

A company called Gitanjali Gems of India came up against a skills shortage in the latter part of the last decade. They faced two problems:

  1. Jewellery manufacturing is a niche skill requiring a lot of training; and

  2. the industry has a high dropout rate.

Their directors decided to actively pursue potential new employees from a new demographic – a group with just 8% workforce participation and a devastating 0.1% full time employment rate. Thanks to this programme, 10% of Gitanjali Gems’ employees are now people with disabilities. There has been a noticeable effect on the company, including greater productivity and lower turnover.

Actively encouraging people with disabilities into your business has clear and measurable benefits whether you have a skills shortage or not.  When you expand your talent pool as far as possible, you will see only benefits. 

We have 150 highly qualified and skilled employees ready to start working for your business now, so if you're finding it difficult to recruit because of a skills shortage, think outside the square.

How many people with disabilities does your business employ?

We want to hear your examples of people with disabilities improving your business outcomes.  Leave a comment below and keep the conversation going. And if you want to increase your productivity, address the skills shortage and have a more reliable and stable workforce, call us at Enabled Employment. We can help.

Magnifying glass over the word skills

Most of the developed world is now entering economic recovery. But Australia is not doing quite as well as some other countries, and there is a looming issue with something all too common during economic growth: a skills shortage.  Skills shortages also occur during economic decline but it can be more pronounced during periods of growth.

Each one of Australia’s states and territories is presently reporting skills shortages in multiple areas and the problem can come in many forms:

  1. Not enough qualified people to fill vacant roles

  2. Lack of experience of qualified people applying for those roles

  3. Disparity between employment package and employee expectations

  4. Jobs that regularly attract no applicants

  5. Unwillingness to relocate.

Tackling the Problem

One way to address the skills shortage is for businesses to offer better conditions and higher wages, but this is not always going to have the desired effect, especially if you are looking for people with niche skills who may not be looking for work. The newly-qualified aren't always going to have the experience you desire.  There is another answer and it means changing your business practice and outlook to focus in on expanding the talent pool.

Considering the disability employment participation rate in Australia and the high unemployment rate (which means they are willing and able to work), it is apparent that there is large untapped resource available to address some of the problems that Australian businesses face.

The Advantages of Employing People With Disabilities

I have discussed on this blog numerous times the impressive statistics regarding employees with disabilities:

  1. They take less sick time and are just as productive as any other worker

  2. They stay in jobs longer (are less likely to move on which is critical in jobs that require a lot of training)

  3. Are willing and motivated, largely because of the low participation rate of their demographic.

A company called Gitanjali Gems of India came up against a skills shortage in the latter part of the last decade. They faced two problems:

  1. Jewellery manufacturing is a niche skill requiring a lot of training; and

  2. the industry has a high dropout rate.

Their directors decided to actively pursue potential new employees from a new demographic – a group with just 8% workforce participation and a devastating 0.1% full time employment rate. Thanks to this programme, 10% of Gitanjali Gems’ employees are now people with disabilities. There has been a noticeable effect on the company, including greater productivity and lower turnover.

Actively encouraging people with disabilities into your business has clear and measurable benefits whether you have a skills shortage or not.  When you expand your talent pool as far as possible, you will see only benefits. 

We have 150 highly qualified and skilled employees ready to start working for your business now, so if you're finding it difficult to recruit because of a skills shortage, think outside the square.

How many people with disabilities does your business employ?

We want to hear your examples of people with disabilities improving your business outcomes.  Leave a comment below and keep the conversation going. And if you want to increase your productivity, address the skills shortage and have a more reliable and stable workforce, call us at Enabled Employment. We can help.

Magnifying glass over the word skills

Posted by Jess May | 0 comments

Comments (0)

There are no comments to display.

Leave a comment

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Page 1 of 1