For over 4 million people with a disability facing adversity is part of everyday life. Especially when it comes to the job marketplace. Unfortunately there are still significant barriers to earning a stable income for many people with a disability. Unemployment rates for this community are unaccept... Read more >

For over 4 million people with a disability facing adversity is part of everyday life. Especially when it comes to the job marketplace. Unfortunately there are still significant barriers to earning a stable income for many people with a disability.

Unemployment rates for this community are unacceptably high. This year unemployment for people with disabilities was twice as high as the general population and labour force participation was half that of the non-disabled workforce.

At Enabled Employment we believe everyone has the right to financial independence, and flexible economic opportunities should be made available to all.

That’s why today we’re announcing a partnership with Uber -  to extend flexible income opportunities to thousands of of people with disabiloities able to drive on the uberX platform.

“We think the time is right for people with a disability to take matters into their own hands and manage their own income opportunities. Uber’s ridesharing platform presents a possibility to change the status quo, which has so far failed to create gainful economic opportunities for people with a disability.” - Jessica May, Founder, Enabled Employment.

We hope this partnership not only helps Enabled Employment members find well-paid income opportunities, but also encourages the 53% of people with disabilities with a driving licence to consider driving on the uberX platform.

This includes partners like Jordan who lives with Achondroplasia and chose to drive on the uberX platform to escape unemployment.

"I was unemployed for a year before I found Uber. I decided to join uber because I wanted to do something during the day while I was looking for a job. It was really hard for me to find another job because of my size, but with uber nothing like that matters.

“Joining Uber was the best decision I’ve ever made. Not only do I get to meet new people and hear funny stories, I can also start when I want and finish when I want.”

“I would recommend Uber to anyone looking for some extra money or finding it hard to find a job.” Jordan, Perth

And partners like Paul who chose to drive with Uber to supplement his income while studying computer science.

"I was born with Spina Bifida and I really should not be here (alive) to write this, let alone having the ability to walk and function reasonably well, something that the majority of people with my condition will never experience.

I have my older brother and sister to thank for my ability to walk and  the most amazing mother in the universe to thank for my life thus far.

I am a chef by trade, but due to my condition I had to retire. Uber has now given me the opportunity to supplement my average wage to the point that I may continue my studies and also afford a few personal splurges here and there.

Finding a second job that allowed me to keep off my feet, not to mention being free to relax and enjoy meeting so many cool people and only do the hours I am comfortable with was impossible until I found Uber.” – Paul, Brisbane.

 Flexible income. Set your own schedule. Great support. Sign up to drive today. To sign up and apply to become a driver partner got to https://get.uber.com/cl/enabled/

 Uber app with a message to a hard of hearing driver -partner

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To kick off of our week long blogging event to celebrate International Day of People with Disability we have turned on of my most popular blog posts 10 Facts About Disability Employment You Won't Believe into an infographic.  Hope you find it eye opening.  Make sure you share and lets try ... Read more >

To kick off of our week long blogging event to celebrate International Day of People with Disability we have turned on of my most popular blog posts 10 Facts About Disability Employment You Won't Believe into an infographic.  Hope you find it eye opening.  Make sure you share and lets try and get this information viral!  Tune in tomorrow for our next blog post by Graeme Innes AM.

Infographic of 10 Facts About Disability Employment You Won't Believe

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Last week, Enabled Employment competed in the 1776 World Cup Challenge, a global competition in 16 cities around the world to identify and celebrate the most promising startups tackling the biggest challenges in four categories: education, energy, health, and cities.  We were up again... Read more >

Last week, Enabled Employment competed in the 1776 World Cup Challenge, a global competition in 16 cities around the world to identify and celebrate the most promising startups tackling the biggest challenges in four categories: education, energy, health, and cities.  We were up against some amazing competitors and it got me thinking about other businesses that are instigating change in the disability sector.

One of the main reasons that Enabled Employment chose to be a for profit business was to try and disrupt the disability sector and encourage other businesses to do the same and instigate social change.  Along the way we are hearing of many innovative businesses in the sector doing some fantastic things with technology so thought I would share some information on these amazing ideas.

Technology is big business – it drives us and this is as true in the disability sector as it is anywhere else. Whether the latest advances in building modification, IT developments, mobile apps or anything else – here are some of the most important developments in the last few years that are or can improve the employability of people with disability.

Hear and Say

The 2014 Queensland Technology and Innovation Award went to the Hear and Say Centre, an organisation dedicated to paediatric care of children with severe hearing difficulties, and those who are completely deaf. The organisation has been operating for 21 years and presently has six centres; it helps families all over the country develop language and communication skills, both for the children, and for the families to communicate with their hearing-impaired children. In the last few years it has branched out into partnerships all over the globe, such is the success of its model.  You can read more about Hear and Say at their website http://www.hearandsay.com.au/

Kenguru

Mobility is one of those issues restricting the mobility of some wheelchair users.  Many wheelchair users do drive and enjoy the freedom of having a car.  For others, simply getting in and out of a car is difficult. Introduced in early 2014, the Kenguru Electric Car addresses this problem.  With a hatch at the back large enough for a wheelchair to roll in and roll out, it has the complete frame of a typical electric car and even looks like a car, but the mechanics of steering and mobility on the inside is more like a motorcycle.  Its weight and design means it is classified as a light motorcycle for license purposes.  Read about thie success at http://www.kenguru.com/

Smartphone Technology for the Blind

Most people are able to enjoy the convenience of a smartphone, all except those who are completely blind.  That is why in 2013 several designers conceptualised and developed Braille Smartphones and the first models went on sale in early 2014.  Previous phones for the blind relied on audio technology, vibrations and voice command – not one had been able to incorporate the technology allowing blind users to read messages.  There are now many options to choose from; it is not clear whether the devices will take off in the long term considering Apple iPhones come with VoiceOver (a gesture based technology), ideal for blind users.  The first braille phone to be released in Australia was the OwnFone https://www.ownfone.com.au/

Lucy Keyboard

People with disability struggle in a working environment and arguably those who struggle most in an office environment are people with very limited or no use of their hands.  Lucy-4 tries to solve this problem using lasers. With a small laser mounted onto head ware – it fits easily onto a pair of glasses and on a headband – simply point the laser at the desired key on the light-sensitive keyboard (ideally placed next to a monitor) and the keyboard will do the rest. Its designer came up with the concept in 1980 and it has gone through several design upgrades since.  More information on Lucy Keyboard is at http://lucykeyboard.com/

Enable Development

Enable Development is one of our partners and is headed up by Huy Nguyen who was the ACT Young Australian of the Year for 2013.  Enable Development is working in collaboration with the Australian National University to develop low cost solutions to assistive technology such as mobility aids, computer accessibility software and sporting equipment.  Through enabling technologies people can invest their money into more fulfilling activities such as traveling the world, gaining higher education. Instead of activities that most people take for granted.  You can read all about the great work that Enable Development is doing in this space at http://enabledevelopment.com/enabletechnology/

Do you know of any other innovations in the disability sector?  I would love to hear about them. Leave me a comment below and we can keep the conversation going.

Chalkboard with a drawing of a light bulb and the text Innovative Start Up

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My blog post on 10 Facts about Disability Employment you won't Believe has been getting a lot of traffic, so I thought I would go into a bit more detail on these and other facts and what Australia is doing to try and change these shocking statistics.  In 2008, the United Nations launched the C... Read more >

My blog post on 10 Facts about Disability Employment you won't Believe has been getting a lot of traffic, so I thought I would go into a bit more detail on these and other facts and what Australia is doing to try and change these shocking statistics. 

In 2008, the United Nations launched the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities. Designed to ensure that people with disabilities were considered equal in the eyes of the law in each participating nation, it covers a multitude of things, including rights regarding employment. Many countries still have low participation rates in the employment sector and in some ways Australia is falling behind many of its developed world counterparts. The country is taking steps to address this imbalance but first we need to look at the current state of affairs.

Hard Facts

In recent years, two separate studies have demonstrated low workforce participation for people with a disability.  The first recorded 54.3% participation and around 84% for people without a disability.  A separate study demonstrated an even greater disparity with the figures at 39.8% and 79.4%.

In 2009, following the worst period of the economic crisis, the national average unemployment rate rose to 5.1%.  However, amongst people with disabilities that figure was 7.9%. The situation for people with mental illness is even worse: participation rate in 2003 was just 28.2% and the unemployment rate in the same year was 19.5%, nearly four times that of the general population.

The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), an organisation dedicated to promoting democracy and the market economy, listed 29 countries for employment rates of people with disability.  Australia was ranked 21st, this was the lowest of all developed nations.  In 2011, Pricewaterhouse Coopers listed quality of life for people with disability in 27 countries.  Unfortunately, Australia came 27th in that list too.

When it comes to poverty, the global average of people with disability living at or below the poverty line is 22%.  Australia’s is over double that at 45%.  It’s hardly surprising when around two thirds of people living with a disability is earning a weekly wage under $320 when the equivalent amongst the general population is one third.  Unfortunately, in Australia, people with disabilities are more likely than any other group to be living day to day in poverty.

So What is Australia Doing about This?

Shocked by some of the findings above, the national government took steps to improve the situation and adhere to disability employment laws as well as international conventions on human rights.  The National Disability Strategy 2010-2020 aims to significantly improve a number of factors related to disability employment including awareness, to allow the individual control over their working lives and to actively encourage businesses to more actively consider people with disabilities’ applications.

Part of this strategy included the establishment of the National Disability Insurance Scheme, a plan to permit people with disability and mental illness to control their own employability and employment. It replaces a number of grants and schemes for individuals for greater workplace participation. It includes (but is not limited to) training and care provisions for those who are ineligible for Job Services Australia and Disability Employment Services, assistive technology and a number of other services. 

By 2020, Australia expects to be amongst the highest rated nations for workforce participation of people with disabilities and mental illness.  We will be watching and waiting to see when the NDIS turns its thoughts to employment which is the logical and very talked about next step.  We, like I'm sure you do, have a lot of suggestions on how this may work in the future.

Lady in business wear stands with clapping colleagues

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A lot of people with disabilities have identifiable physical signs and the potential employer may already be aware of their disability.   People with mental health issues on the other hand often find themselves in a grey area and feeling anxious about what they can be open about, when and if th... Read more >

A lot of people with disabilities have identifiable physical signs and the potential employer may already be aware of their disability.   People with mental health issues on the other hand often find themselves in a grey area and feeling anxious about what they can be open about, when and if they should tell someone, and to whom.

Mental Health and Work

The Mental Illness Fellowship of Australia (MIFA) reported in 2010 that 60% of respondents felt that employment and support for seeking employment was a key concern, second only to housing.  Many stated that employment was not only feasible but also key to their recovery.  A 2003 analysis showed that workforce participation rate for people with mental illness was 28.2% with the unemployment rate at 19.5%; this compares to people with physical disabilities at 48% participation and 7.7% unemployment.  Furthermore, MIFA also reports that people with mental illnesses are the largest group to access disability employment services and have the lowest rate of positive outcomes for securing and remaining in employment – the report cited employer reluctance, based on misunderstanding, to recruit people with mental illness.

Though there are no legal obligations to do so, there are pros and cons to informing or not informing an employer.

Reasons to inform your employer:

- Permits your employer to investigate any potential adjustments to your working pattern – an example might be necessary time off for therapy or counselling or company support programmes

- As with any other employee with a disability, employers are legally obliged to take reasonable steps to accommodate you

- Protects your rights as a person with a disability and where necessary, your right to bring a Disability Discrimination Complaint should disciplinary action ever require such an action

Reasons not to inform your employer:

- When the mental health condition does not and will not impact the job and cannot see that you will ever require reasonable adjustment

- Your right to privacy and trusting your own judgement about your condition

- Concern that being open about your condition may lead to discrimination, harassment or might affect promotion prospects

What an Employer Can Do

Employers are legally obliged to make reasonable accommodations for employees with disabilities.  Workplace adjustments for people with mental illness might reasonably include some of the following:

- Flexible working conditions

- The option of the employee with a mental illness to work with a mentor

- Modifying the job role to reduce stress and anxiety if the job role proves stressful

- Mental health awareness training for staff and management

- Any required physical modifications

- The offer of counselling or any other help that might assist the employee to be fully productive in the work place

Support Services and Assistance

The National Mental Health and Disability Employment Strategy (NMHDES) released in September 2009 aims to assist people with mental illness and disabilities obtain and retain employment. There is an annual fund of $1.2b that started in financial year 2009-10.

The Disability Employment Service is applicable to people with mental illness. It provides flexible assistance for those seeking work and for those who require help as part of employment they are already engaged in.

The Employee Assistance Fund (EAF) provides assistance and access to necessary resources for employees and employers including advice on relevant workplace modifications. The EAF is the major source of funding for workplace assistance for people with mental illness and helps with education for employers regarding mental health issues; for employees it offers special support and training packages.

JobAccess provides advice and workplace solutions for people with mental illness and their employers.  The service is free and has professional psychologists as part of its team.  The professional services include information on the full range of government funded services, practical working solutions and how to create and maintain a productive and healthy working environment for people with disabilities or mental illness.  It can also advise on the full range of legal obligations and offers information on financial assistance.

The Workplace Adjustment Tool is an online database that gives advice on potential workplace adjustments that you might make for an employee with a mental illness – and key indicators that the staff member might be experiencing an issue.  A wide range of issues are covered: depression and anxiety, eating disorders, dementia and personality disorders.

Mindfulemployer.org offers a wide range of advice for employers, especially in the realms of education and awareness.  They provide regular workshops with employers in mind.

Similarly, Beyondblue.org.au covers the spectrum of mental health awareness and offers advice on making a workplace a healthy place to be for people with mental illness.

Business woman sitting and reading a book

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